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Milkwood Blog

String em up – storing onions

March 24, 2012 | Farming, Food, Gardening, Grow It, Market Garden, Preserving | 6 comments | Author:

Now that Autumn’s here, our woolshed is bedecked in produce and garlands… brown onions, red onions, preserves, pickles and all the rest. And it turns out (fortunately) that stringing onions into a garland is actually quite easy.

Stephen's preferred stringing space - the outside washup

Stephen, he who had grown said onions with tender loving care in our market garden, was in charge of the stringing. It all went very well and they are now hanging in the woolshed ready to welcome students to tomorrow’s Starting an Organic Market Garden course.

We’re all rather chuffed that we have a heap of produce to show and share with these course students, as the last market garden course was held right at the beginning of our market garden journey, and we were pretty much dependent on the supermarket for catering-scale vegies at that point. Not anymore!

Anyway. Onions. Here’s a great how to string onions post with loads of pictures. It worked for us!

Stephen also wrote a great how to plant onions blog last October. We’ll be using this technique again in the spring…

Planing red onions - October 2011

Red onions, December 2011
All strung up and ready to store - March 2012

Many thanks to Stephen the OMG for his dedication to our Farm’s food production. Thanks also to the onions, sunlight, compost and everything else that contributed to us having the funkiest (and functional) woolshed decorations in town…


  • http://theroadtoserendipity.wordpress.com narf77

    Tasmania is a great place to grow potent onions (still crying from my last peeling event) but I have never tried to grow them myself. Cheers for the link on how to grow them. I might have a go at growing some next season. It looks like Stephen might have watched his mum do macrame when he was a small child…I know that it is time to revive this great way to make artistic owls that fell of the wall, strange belts that we hid rather than be forced to wear and various weird lop sided pot plant hangers…oh wait a minute…that was MY mum ;)

    • http://milkwood.net milkwoodkirsten

      That is gold! Yes, bring on the macrame owls!

      • http://theroadtoserendipity.wordpress.com narf77

        And the belts! The watch bands and the hanging tables that collapse on the floor with all of your drinks when you are too sozzled to be able to catch them going…Ah the 70’s lol :)

  • farmer john

    Ok this helped to see but really was not the information I needed. There was no description on weights or even how to go about doing it. Is that some special Milkwood secret?

  • http://www.myherbgardening.com Debra

    Onions are so easy to grow. Just remember they like a lot of fertilizer.



  • http://theroadtoserendipity.wordpress.com narf77

    Tasmania is a great place to grow potent onions (still crying from my last peeling event) but I have never tried to grow them myself. Cheers for the link on how to grow them. I might have a go at growing some next season. It looks like Stephen might have watched his mum do macrame when he was a small child…I know that it is time to revive this great way to make artistic owls that fell of the wall, strange belts that we hid rather than be forced to wear and various weird lop sided pot plant hangers…oh wait a minute…that was MY mum ;)

    • http://milkwood.net milkwoodkirsten

      That is gold! Yes, bring on the macrame owls!

      • http://theroadtoserendipity.wordpress.com narf77

        And the belts! The watch bands and the hanging tables that collapse on the floor with all of your drinks when you are too sozzled to be able to catch them going…Ah the 70’s lol :)

  • farmer john

    Ok this helped to see but really was not the information I needed. There was no description on weights or even how to go about doing it. Is that some special Milkwood secret?

  • http://www.myherbgardening.com Debra

    Onions are so easy to grow. Just remember they like a lot of fertilizer.

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