Screen shot 2010-07-09 at 9.35.43 PM

Seven Thousand Oaks

| Art | 1 comments | Author :

Vicki Mason Oregano, Wattle and Rose brooches. Photo by Bill Shaylor

Recently I found myself sitting in a Melbourne basement talking to interesting people for a whole day. It was an unusual Sunday for me. Once upon a time, this sort of thing was quite normal in my life, but these days my Sundays seem to be spent either hosting Permaculture courses, or digging holes, or considering lichen, or re-thinking the planting design for the second food forest below the main swale. So a day spent chatting in a basement was quite a treat, in its way.

This long chat was a forum as part of the Seven Thousand Oaks festival. I think i was there in the capacity of an artist/farmer who also delves in sustainability education, but I’m not certain… what i do know is that I met a bunch of amazing and inspiring folks and came back home full of new ideas and different directions relating to Permaculture, mapping, social sustainability and covenants. Including the following:

Microcosms in Melbourne

| Art, Seed Balls | 0 comments | Author :
seedballs on tarp

Just a little note of an off-site project of ours happening in Melbourne this month as part of the 2010 Food and Wine Festival. Westspace's series of rooftop installations entitled 'The High Life' is part of The Edible Garden initiative being spearheaded by the venerable Diggers Club as part of this year's festival.

Kirsten's contribution to this series is a seed ball project entitled The Latent Power of Germination and will be up on the rooftop of the Order of Melbourne from the 16-23 March, and also throughout the city thanks to hundreds of complimentary packets of seed balls. You can read all about it at Westspace's The High Life project page.

So if you live in Melbourne, please come along, sneak a peek, pick up a packet and off you go, a veritable harbringer of bloom.

Seedballs: from Fukuoka to Green Guerillas

| Art, Permaculture Techniques, Seed Balls | 1 comments | Author :
seedballs at milkwood
Seed balls in the making at Milkwood
The poetry of the Seedball concept is simple, yet immense. Encase a seed (or seeds) in a protective jacket of clay, creating a Seed ball. Distribute Seedballs across ground, not worrying if this day, or this month even, is the best time to ‘sow’. Protected from insects, buirds, heat and sunlight until the time is right, the seedball activates with a rain event which is sufficient to soak through the clay coating to germinate the seed. Which incidentally is the sort of rain event that you want to have directly following the perfect seed sowing day. And that’s it. But that’s not all.